cookiesWith March Madness just round the corner, you might want to pick up Cookie Johnson’s biography, Believing in Magic. Cookie tells of her on-again, off again, relationship with local MSU hero, Earvin “Magic” Johnson. Cookie reveals her fears, heartache and anger when her husband of 45 days tells her, and the world that he is HIV positive. Throughout their marriage of ups and downs, Cookie is resilient. Magic introduces her to a child from a previous relationship – Andre, and their own child announces that he is gay. Yet Cookie manages to rise to every occasion with amazing strength and solidity, advocate for ways to fight disease and establish a line of premium denim clothing. Her story is well written, and you will feel the happiness and sorrow that make up “Cookie”.

P.S.  Her given name is Earletha.

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Rita’s Review: The Residence: Inside the Private World of the White House

residenceNow that the election is over, and a new president is about to be inaugurated, you may find Kate Anderson Brower’s, The Residence: Inside the Private World of the White House, very interesting. This book offers behind the scene interviews with White House staff members, both past and present.  Employees offer tantalizing descriptions of the first families and their relationships with them, describing how they accommodate and fulfill every need for those called to our highest office.

These employees are held to near impossible standards of privacy, and Brower emphasizes that longevity and continued discretion of these individuals indicates an unstoppable devotion to this institution. The staff describe tragic events in history that changed us all, but they also provide fascinating insight into those responsible for decision-making during those tragedies.

You may find yourself understanding and empathizing with the enormity of those charged with representing us all despite our own political views or assumptions.

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Rita’s Review: Among The Wicked

wickedIf you haven’t read any of Linda Castillo’s Amish series, you are really missing out. In Among the Wicked, Chief of Police Kate Burkholder, is asked to go under cover as an Amish widow, in upstate New York. Kate was raised Amish, but left after a traumatic incident, and the sheriff feels that Kate can infiltrate the Amish community in his jurisdiction. A teenage girl is found dead and there are rumors of child abuse.The sheriff fears foul play, and the new Bishop is high on his guilty radar. This is no easy assignment, and Kate asks a few too many questions and finds herself in extreme danger. With no one to talk to or anyone to help, Kate must handle the situation with only her wits. What she uncovers will surprise you, and keep you reading late into the night. Castillo does not disappoint in her latest Amish mystery.

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In 1942 Enrico Fermi and a team of scientists were working on a top secret project called the Manhattan Project.  This was the research on developing the atomic bomb done at Stagg Field, the University of Chicago football stadium.  The Accidental Agent by Andrew Rosenheim tells the story of a fictional FBI agent who is asked to determine whether or not a Nazi has managed to infiltrate the research group.  Many of the scientists in the group were European immigrants and some of their credentials had been difficult to verify.  Is it possible that one of them had been recruited as a spy?  Jimmy Nessheim had asked for an extended leave from the FBI to attend law school at the University of Chicago.  Since he is in the right place and has the perfect cover story, he is asked by his superiors to resume his Special Agent status to observe the scientists’ work.  The novel is filled with shadowy characters, including two ex-girlfriends and thugs from his past.  As Jimmy tries to understand just how far the Manhattan Project is progressing and if all the scientists involved are who they say they are, all sorts of complications emerge.  The book has interesting and understandable details about the nuclear experiment.  It also has the noir feel of 1940’s spycraft.

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There have recently been several novels released about the lives of private citizens trying to survive the German occupation of Paris during WWII.  Lilac Girls, All the Light We Cannot See, and The House of Dreams have all used real life characters to enhance their stories.  Les Parisiennes: How the Women of Paris Lived, Loved, and Died Under the Nazi Occupation by Anne Sebba is the non-fiction story of many of the brave women who either struggled against the Nazi regime or collaborated with the invaders and were then often prosecuted for their actions after the war ended.  Some of the names are ones we are familiar with, some are ones that we have never heard about.  The fashion designer Chanel was well known for selling to the Germans, then when the Americans arrived in Paris, they were given a free bottle of perfume for their wives or girlfriends.  Rose Valland, an employee of an art museum, managed to keep a detailed list of many of the art works that the Germans had removed from France which was useful in getting art works returned to their original owners. Many women’s actions are documented for the duration of the war.  My only criticism is that the book is divided into time periods, making it difficult to connect with a particular woman’s entire life story.


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Historical fiction can be an effective way for anyone trying to get basic knowledge of a period.  When facts are revealed as a story they are easier to understand and remember.  A great introduction to the beginning years of Queen Victoria’s reign is the novel Victoria by Daisy Godwin.  Victoria inherited the throne when she was only eighteen years old.  Although she knew she would be queen, she had been given very little exposure to the politics of reigning.  Her widowed mother insisted that she was protecting her by keeping Victoria almost secluded.  Victoria’s diaries and court observations are used as sources that show us someone who would now be defined as a rebellious teenager.  At the very beginning of her reign she asserted herself by distancing herself from her mother and making her own choice as to the name she wished to be known by.  She did commit several political missteps and the author depicted the known facts in a very plausible manner, giving Victoria what would seem like understandable motivations.  My occasional dissatisfaction with historical fiction is when an author seems to place contemporary values in a different era and that did not happen in this novel.


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The central character in King of Fear by Drew Chapman is Garrett Reilly, a bond trader who had worked for the government on a secret project which made use of his unique ability to work with numbers.  He is no longer working for the government and is mourning the death of his mentor who gave him his position on Wall Street.  When a woman assassinated the president of the New York City Federal Bank, she claimed she had been directed by Reilly to do the shooting.  This is the beginning of an effort to destroy the American economy.  With every federal agent in the country searching for Reilly, he managed to reassemble his team to find out who is trying to destroy America and why.  This is a very exciting novel that describes the ways that determined hackers can destroy a nation’s infrastructure.  The people on Reilly’s team all have interesting character defects, several that make them effective at anti-terrorism.  All sorts of tricky ways to get information are revealed.



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